FAKTR PNE: A Sneak Peek at our Newest Course Offering

FAKTR PNE: A Sneak Peek at our Newest Course Offering

January 22, 2020

Carpal Tunnel Syndrome. Quadrilateral Space Syndrome. Pronator Syndrome.

These are the classics that you may be aware of, but peripheral nerve entrapments are the root causes of pain more than you may think.  In fact, most practitioners encounter these in some form or fashion on a weekly basis.

This unique course offering takes our FAKTR concepts and applies them to the assessment and treatment of peripheral nerve entrapments–de-mystifying these syndromes and providing you with treatments you can apply immediately on Monday morning.

In the video above, our Director of Education, Dr. Todd Riddle sat down with our two FAKTR PNE instructors to discuss the new course and answer important questions regarding these common patient presentations.

Click here to learn more about our FAKTR PNE course and view upcoming course dates.



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